Gholamreza Aavani: “The Concept of the ‘Human’ in the Koran According to Sufi Masters” & “Humans as the Guardians of the Earth: An Islamic Perspective” (6/24/13 & 6/27/13)

Lecture I

Title: The Concept of the “Human” in the Koran According to Sufi Masters

Time: 10:00-12:00, June 24, 2013

Location: Moonlight Hall, Ying Jie Exchange Center, Peking University

 

Lecture II

Title: Humans as the Guardians of the Earth: an Islamic Perspective

Time: 15:00-17:00, June 27, 2013

Location: Moonlight Hall, Ying Jie Exchange Center, Peking University

 

Commentator: Prof. Tu Weiming

Organizer: Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies & World Ethics Institute Beijing

 

About the speaker:

Gholamreza Aavani, born in Iran in 1943, received his Ph.D. in philosophy from University of Tehran in 1976. Aavani is currently Director of the Iranian Philosophical Society (IPS), President of the International Society for Islamic Philosophy (ISIP), Steering Committee Member of the International Federation of Philosophy Societies (FISP), Chair of the Department of Western Philosophy at the Iranian Institute of Philosophy (IRIP), Professor at Shahid Beheshti University, Member of the Faculty of Islamic Philosophy and Theology, Iranian Academy of the Sciences, and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the International Society for Islamic Philosophy (ISIP), Philosophia Islamica. Professor Aavani is proficient in Persian, Arabic, English, and French and has reading knowledge of Attic and Koine Greek, Latin, and German. He has published numerous articles and books, including Philosophy and Spiritual Art (in Persian, Hekmat-o Honar-e Ma’navi; Grous Publications, 1976). In honor of his outstanding achievement in Islamic philosophy and other related social activities, Professor Aavani was awarded Honorary Member of the Kazakhstan Academy of Science (2011), Farabi Award for Humanities (2009), Distinguished Professor and Researcher of the Hua-Jung University of China (2004-2006), and one of the ‘Chehreha-ye Mandegar’ (Perennial Icons of Iranian Culture’), which is the highest national accolade awarded to an Iranian academic (2001). Aavani’s current research project seeks to produce a critical edition of the collected works by Avicenna with the collaboration of about 30 scholars from Iran and abroad. About a third of Avicenna’s works have remained in the manuscript form and are yet unpublished. Meanwhile, Professor Aavani is dedicated to promoting the dialogue between Islamic and other cultures, with the hope of furthering intercultural and inter-religious exchange through academic influence.